LA’s ‘Hype House’ Is Not So Hype Anymore

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Published January 18, 2022
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The Montclarion
The Netflix series, "Hype House," was released on Jan. 7. Photo Courtesy of Netflix

Warning: This article mentions topics that could potentially be triggering or uncomfortable for some readers.

Over the years, many content houses have been created, including notable ones like Team 10, The Clout House, Clubhouse and The Vlog Squad. However, there’s one thing they all have in common: they no longer exist.

There is one lonely content house currently left standing, The Hype House.

Released on Jan. 7, the eight-episode Netflix series, “Hype House” follows a collective of young content creators who live together to collaborate on videos for TikTok and their other personal platforms in an effort to grow their social media careers.

The Hype House was first established in December 2019 by Thomas Petrou, a young entrepreneur known for his YouTube videos, as well as Chase Hudson aka Lil Huddy and Alex Warren. It is filled with several other social media personalities that have millions of followers including Vinnie Hacker, Larri Merritt aka Larray, Nikita Dragun, Mia Hayward, Kouvr Annon and Jack Wright.

Sienna Mae Gomez, a content creator known for her messages about body positivity, also filmed for the show but was edited out due to legal issues with another castmate and is no longer a part of The Hype House.

Hype House members Nikita Dragun (left) and Chase Hudson (right) sit down to have a discussion about Hudson's role in the business. Photo Courtesy of Netflix

Hype House members Nikita Dragun (left) and Chase Hudson (right) sit down to have a discussion about Hudson’s role in the business.
Photo Courtesy of Netflix

Right from the start, audience members are taken into the luxuriousness of what it is to be a content creator in California. From $5 million houses that are paid for by brand deals to expensive cars and designer clothing, it’s certainly a life many would love to live.

However, it’s not as fun and pretty as one may think it is. While the series highlights and gives insight into content creators’ daily routines, it focuses more on the struggles of this high life.

In each episode, the cameras switch between the main Hype House occupied by most of its members based in Moorpark, California and another house located in Encino, California occupied by Hudson.

Hudson moved out to focus on his music career but promised Petrou and the other members he would still help create content to keep the house running.

Without much being said, audience members can see this dynamic is creating a divide between the members and is specifically putting a huge burden on Petrou who struggles to keep the house going.

Co-founders Thomas Petrou (right) and Chase Hudson (left) attempt to hash out their differences after an ongoing uncertainty of where Hudson stands in the business. Photo Courtesy of Netflix

Co-founders Thomas Petrou (right) and Chase Hudson (left) attempt to hash out their differences after an ongoing uncertainty of where Hudson stands in the business.
Photo Courtesy of Netflix

Petrou strongly believes the house is worth saving as former Hype House stars like Charli D’Amelio and Addison Rae have made very successful careers for themselves.

While this aspect informs the audience, some may find themselves in utter boredom as each episode only films between both houses. Throughout the whole series, no other locations are really displayed except a gym and a local shop.

Along with the uncertainty of where the actual brand of The Hype House stands, the creators also dive into their struggle with fake friends and cancel culture.

When uploading a 30-second video to social media, nothing much is expected unless you’re one of these stars; every little thing is scrutinized, and one can get canceled for anything.

One minute someone is your friend, but the next they are seen talking behind your back in the tabloids.

It’s a constant feeling of having to step on eggshells for these creators.

With cancel culture, the series also calls attention to and encapsulates how the creators face thousands, if not millions, of death threats and horrid comments like “you should kill yourself.”

Just seeing what these individuals go through on a daily basis generates a sad, almost depressing feeling for the audience. Society paints this glorious picture of them but in reality, has no idea who they truly are and where they came from.

(Left to right): Vinnie Hacker, Alex Warren and Thomas Petrou are members of The Hype House. Photo courtesy of Netflix

(Left to right): Vinnie Hacker, Alex Warren and Thomas Petrou are members of The Hype House.
Photo courtesy of Netflix

From unwanted fame and abusive households to homelessness and family deaths, these creators have endured real-life struggles and have worked extremely hard to be in their current position.

While we don’t exactly know what the future holds for “Hype House,” there are many lessons one can take away from this series.

It may be cliché to say, but never judge a book by its cover. Most importantly, simply be kind to others.

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