The Perks of Having a Double Major

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Published November 6, 2016
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The Montclarion
Photo Courtesy: CollegeDegrees360 (Flickr)
Photo Courtesy: CollegeDegrees360 (Flickr)

Photo Courtesy: CollegeDegrees360 (Flickr)

As winter registration approaches, students are exploring the idea of double majoring in an effort to become marketable after graduation. Admittedly, having two majors is not easy. It is demanding, stressful and may cost students another year’s or semester’s worth of tuition. However, they come out with a collection of connections, skills and proficiencies to attract potential employers.

Each year, more students are graduating from colleges and universities, and employers are looking beyond the basic degree for entry level work. Now, graduating with a bachelor’s degree does not automatically qualify a student for a job. Employers are looking for more. They are in search of individuals who have bachelor’s degrees as well as experience in their fields.

Students who double major have the advantage of a long repertoire of classes that they can present to hiring managers to show that they have experience, or at least a base amount of knowledge. Having taken more than one class for something like editing, for example, demonstrates to employers a higher level of proficiency and a lesser need for training. A diverse list of courses can be a double major’s greatest asset when employers are searching for an array of skills.

In addition to providing students with a diverse repertoire of skills, double majoring grants students access to a wider variety of resources, be it professors, advisors or department managers. Normally, these resources possess a comprehensive understanding of their particular field due to many years’ worth of experience. While an English major can easily walk into a journalism professor’s office, it is more difficult to network throughout the department. A double major can do so with greater ease.

In the age of technology, the world is bigger and smaller all at once. There is no real divide between job fields. For example, skills a computer science major learns in college could be used in the field of graphic design. The job market is changing, producing employers who want it all but only want to hire one person. Taking up a second major demonstrates one’s understand of the changing market. Double majors have a unique skill set and are able to take on varied job titles and company needs. For many employers, these students are much more valuable.

Double majoring requires a lot of work and time, but the results are usually worthwhile. Double majors are great, but they do not replace actual experience. While a double major student might not have the time to churn out three or four internships, the internships they are able to complete speak to their time management skills and discipline. While it may be difficult at times, students come out better than they started, with more under their belts to present to employers, and a greater opportunity to secure jobs post-graduation.

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