The Most Boring Yet Historical Super Bowl Ever

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Published February 6, 2019
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The Montclarion
Super Bowl LIII was held at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. Photo courtesy of elisfkc via Flickr

It is definitely safe to say that the 2019 Super Bowl halftime show was a fail, but don’t take my word for it. The halftime show currently has 8.8 million views on YouTube with 700,000 dislikes and only 99,000 likes, having a worse ratio percentage than YouTube Rewind 2018, which is the most disliked YouTube video on YouTube.

Did you even see the “Spongebob Squarepants” tribute during the halftime show? That was probably the biggest letdown of the Super Bowl LIII. Let us not forget about the unimpressive commercials that left a mundane conviction.

Perhaps my expectations were too high, but people from Twitter were not impressed either. Users expressed their disappointment through witty memes and video re-enactments of how the halftime show should’ve been executed this time around.

The halftime show appeared awkward and forced by bringing vastly distinctive genres together, such as the conventional pop songs with gospel music while having the guitarist from Maroon 5, James Valentine, play his rock-style solo.

The mixture of these artists and genres simply created a juxtaposed performance.

Unsurprisingly, the halftime show wasn’t the only fail of the night. Coming in second place is the actual game itself.

Granted, this year’s Super Bowl did make history by having the youngest coach, Sean McVay, at almost age 33, in a Super Bowl game. The game also made history by having the oldest coach who has won a Super Bowl title, Bill Belichick, at the age of 66, according to The New York Times.

Regardless, Super Bowl LIII became the lowest scored game in history at a whopping 13-3 game-point difference.

As for the audience in the stadium, watching almost a four-hour football game with little to no action throughout all three quarters is insulting given the overpriced tickets one must pay to reserve their seats.

According to Stubhub Pressbox, tickets cost on average $4,367 and there were 300 last-minute tickets being sold at $3,000.

One would assume that watching from the comfort of your own home would be more practical and suitable since you can watch all of the best Super Bowl commercials, but even that was a letdown.

According to Ad Meter, the worst ad commercial was Burger King’s ad revolving around Andy Warhol awkwardly and quietly eating a whopper adding no further context from a film clip that is 37 years old.

The commercials used to be sporadic and memorable but are now trying to take a stance on moral and ethical social causes with their products.

In 2014, Budweiser released a commercial called “Puppy Love” where we follow the journey of one adorable dog trying to hang out with his best friend who was a horse. Their owners forbid them from seeing one another but both animals were persistent and wanted to continue their bond.

Now the commercial had nothing to do with beer, social justice issues, nor did it invoke a positive message for all, but it pulled on the heartstrings of many people because it was an innocent and cathartic story.

We know as an audience what to expect from overproduced commercials, perfectly executed halftime shows with a tremendous light show and exhilarating game play from the top teams.

Perhaps as a faithful viewer of the Super Bowl year after year, my expectations are never met because of the relentless repetition and predictable routine of the overall format.

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