Home Entertainment Netflix’s ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre’ Will Have You Reaching For a Barf Bag

Netflix’s ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre’ Will Have You Reaching For a Barf Bag

by Vanessa Diaz

The new “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” film, now streaming on Netflix, is something you should not waste your time watching. But if you do decide to watch, heed this warning: make sure you have an empty stomach first.

Directed by David Blue Garcia, “Texas Chainsaw Massacre,” released on Feb. 18, revolves around Melody (Sarah Yarkin), Dante (Jacob Latimore) and Ruth (Nell Hudson). Alongside the group is Melody’s younger sister, Lila (Elsie Fisher).

(Left to right): Lila (Elisa Fisher), Melody (Sarah Yarkin), Ruth (Nell Hudson) and Dante (Jacob Latimore) standing in Harlow. Photo courtesy of Netflix

(Left to right): Lila (Elsie Fisher), Melody (Sarah Yarkin), Ruth (Nell Hudson) and Dante (Jacob Latimore) stand in Harlow, an abandoned Texas town.
Photo courtesy of Netflix

The visionary group is looking to bring a new start and community to a forgotten ghost town located in Texas. Little do they know, this town is home to the infamous killer, Leatherface. After the group has a rocky start and disrupts the “peace” in town, they unleash the crazed serial killer and are now fighting to escape and save their lives.

The abandoned town filled with only dust and run-down buildings located in the deep southern part of Texas is a perfect setting for a horror film. There is something about knowing there is little to no chance for the characters to get help that makes the movie a tiny bit scarier. There is nowhere to run; their only option is to hide from Leatherface and hope he doesn’t find them. But of course, with their obvious hiding spots, he does.

The amount of gore the film includes is on point. Compared to the original “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” released in 1974, the 2022 version is a lot more blood-filled and brutal. The bus scene will leave you especially traumatized. So, if you are not a fan of gore or if you have a weak stomach, I suggest watching another film.

Lila (Elsie Fisher) falls to the ground as she watches the people around her being slaughtered. Photo courtesy of Netflix

Lila (Elsie Fisher) falls to the ground as she watches the people around her being slaughtered.
Photo courtesy of Netflix

However, even with its positive traits, this film still received 34% on Rotten Tomatoes. And for good reason.

While being introduced to the characters, you don’t see enough great characteristics in them. Instead, you’re left not liking them as they come off as quite annoying.

In addition, the deaths, which are usually the part of the film that both scare the viewer and hit them emotionally, happen way too quickly. You are not given enough time to mourn the losses and sympathize with the characters.

One of Leatherface's victims. Photo courtesy of Netflix

One of Leatherface’s victims.
Photo courtesy of Netflix

“Texas Chainsaw Massacre” also had the problem of using basic horror movie clich├ęs. If you have watched the recent films “Halloween Kills” or “Scream 5,” you will notice the similarity to those movies. For example, “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” took the opportunity to bring back an original character, Sally Hardesty (Olwen Fouere), the final girl from the original film.

There are many repetitive horror movies and this was one of them, which made it extremely disappointing. There were many chances for this film to be better, but Garcia went in a completely different direction.

“Texas Chainsaw Massacre” will leave you bored and unentertained. It never evokes true fear. Even if you are typically afraid of horror movies, this one will still be watchable for you, which is not a good thing. Though the violent scenes do make it a proper slaughter film, it lacks vision.

It is best they put down the chainsaw and let the “Texas Chainsaw Massacre” series die.

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