‘Charlie’s Angels’ Has an Unoriginal Storyline, but is Still Ready to Fly

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Published November 20, 2019
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The Montclarion
The new Charlie's Angels and a female Bosley ready to save the world for a new generation of film audiences. Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures.

After over 16 years since the last film in the “Charlie’s Angels” series, Sony introduces some new, younger generation Angels, with a plot similar to other spy-comedy films. However, with powerful chemistry, feminist ideas and fast-paced fighting sequences, Charlie’s Angels are still ready to spread their wings and fly.

In “Charlie’s Angels,” Sabina Wilson, Elena Houghlin and Jane Kano, played by Kristen Stewart, Naomi Scott and Ella Balinska, are brought together to take down corrupt businessmen who want to put an energy conservation device, known as Calisto, onto the black market.

Nobody will believe Elena’s warnings about the dangers of Calisto, such as its EMP generators triggering fatal seizures in people. Along with their handler Bosley, played by director Elizabeth Banks, the Angels take it upon themselves to fly around the world to stop Calisto’s imminent threat and save the world.

The chemistry between Stewart, Scott and Balinska is hysterical. Stewart’s character, Sabina, is more wild on the Angel’s missions. This contrasts to the straight-laced personality of Balinska’s character Jane, leading to some humorous hostility.

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Noah Centineo as Langston and Ella Balinska as Jane Kano in the new rendition of “Charlie’s Angels.” Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures.

One moment where Jane breaks that stoicism is when she flirts with Langston, Elena’s assistant, played by Noah Centineo. Watching Elena get unwittingly dragged into the spy life reminded me of Kevin Hart’s character in “Central Intelligence.” She can’t believe her eyes as bullets whizz through the air around her and her normal life collapses in shambles.

Even though there are a few personality clashes, the women don’t sit back as corrupt businessmen or spies try to conquer the world. Instead, they show bravery by fighting the havoc with gadgets and martial arts, all while wearing stylish dresses.

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Ella Balinska as Jane Kano and Patrick Stewart as John Bosley. Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures.

Patrick Stewart did well in his performance as John Bosley, Charlie’s first assistant. While I will not go into all the details, let’s just say that Patrick Stewart gives a bigger fight than you’d expect from his earlier years playing the pacifistic Professor X in the “X-Men” films.

Director Elizabeth Banks did well as one of the other “Bosley’s,” known as Rebekah, as her character is both serious and comical. She keeps the other Angels on top of the mission while hacking computers and traveling the globe in fancy outfits and expensive cars.

The music, composed by Brian Tyler, is filled with extensive electronic and R&B sounds that highlight the thrilling moments in each scene. The music, combined with their actions, was like watching a female-led spinoff of the “Fast and Furious” franchise.

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Jane Kano, Sabina Wilson and Elena Houghlin looking to take down threats in the new “Charlie’s Angels.” Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures.

One of the songs for the film was “Don’t Call Me Angel,” sung by Ariana Grande, Lana Del Rey and Miley Cyrus. Upon watching the official music video on YouTube, I noticed the graphics and lyrics of the song depicted that women should be respected beyond their beauty, as they know how to fight and are free to fly wherever they like without the ownership of pompous men.

Exotic locations such as Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and Istanbul, Turkey are great settings for the film. There are adventures around every corner for the Angels when they throw down evil and throw down on the dance floor at the same time.

Overall, even if the plot was not the most original, “Charlie’s Angels” was able to stand strong by showing three unique ladies combining friendship with fast-paced martial arts to protect the world. I’d recommend catching up with the Angels’ films from 2000 and 2003, but this particular one is good for younger audience members.

Through an ample amount of humor, action, music and exotic locations, Sony’s “Charlie’s Angels” is satisfying and ready to fly.

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