Measles Finds its Way to Lakewood, NJ

By

Published November 14, 2018
A A A Share
The Montclarion
A screenshot of the community message on measles from Montclair State University.

Montclair State University alerted the campus community about the measles outbreak in Lakewood, New Jersey. According to The New Jersey Department of Health, there are two confirmed cases of measles. Those who traveled to Lakewood between Oct. 25 and Oct. 30 could have been exposed to the disease.

The locations that may have caused exposure include:

NPGS Grocery Store, 231 Main St., Lakewood, New Jersey 08701
Oct. 25 between 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Oct. 29 between 2:15 – 4:45 p.m.
Pizza Plus, 241 4th St., Lakewood, New Jersey 08701
Oct. 28 between 12:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Symptoms of the disease include high fever, cough, runny nose, red or watery eyes and a rash. If someone begins to develop these symptoms they are being instructed to call their doctor first in order to avoid exposing others to the disease.

Measles was a common fatal childhood disease before the vaccine became available. New Jersey requires college students to provide proof of vaccination for measles and other infectious diseases. The University Health Center enforces this law.

According to The New Jersey Department of Health, 90 percent of people with close contact with an infected person will get measles if they are not vaccinated.

It is imperative to have up-to-date immunizations before entering a college campus and especially before going on international trips.

Dr. Patricia Ruiz, director of the University Health Center, confirmed there have been no reports of measles on campus thus far.

“In the event of a suspected case of measles, we would isolate the person and care for their immediate health needs,” Ruiz said. “At the same time we would contact the Montclair Health Department if we have a suspected case.”

The outbreak is being closely monitored by The New Jersey Department of Health and the University Health Center.

“Just because the person’s symptoms suggest measles, it must be confirmed by a laboratory test,” Ruiz said. “We would work closely with the health department and the university.”

 

Join the Conversation