Casey’s COVID-cation: Blog Two

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Published November 10, 2020
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The Montclarion
I pose with my favorite cup, which I use to drink water, for my Day Two photo. Casey Masterson | The Montclarion

Remember when I told you guys I have bad luck? It really didn’t like when I told you about being asymptomatic. I now have symptoms.

Yesterday evening, I started to run temperatures near the dreaded COVID-19 fever, or 100.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Now, I am not a doctor, but I think my body is trying to do its best to protect me. My fever has been fluctuating between 99.5 and 100.7 F throughout all of yesterday and today.

I have also developed some dizziness, my throat is itchy and I am pretty lethargic. The big scare, however, came with my breathing.

I have anxiety, so naturally, I have been a nervous wreck recently. Last night, my chest started to feel tight; call me a hypochondriac if you must, but I was immediately convinced that my lungs were shutting down.

I left the University Health Center (UHC) a message, explaining that I wanted an appointment. I spent the night worriedly texting friends, afraid to go to sleep and lose control of my breathing altogether.

The UHC contacted me this morning; they were very efficient and I was able to speak on the phone with a nurse practitioner by 12:30 p.m.

I wish I could remember her name; she was very kind. She assured me that my tight chest was a symptom of anxiety and that I was not dying. She also informed me of a breathing technique to help with the tightness, and she told me to call Montclair State University Emergency Medical Services if it gets worse.

COVID-19 breathing complications would be more like getting winded while walking from the couch to the fridge. I am fortunate enough to not have that problem.

Classwork helps keep me sane during isolation. Casey Masterson | The Montclarion

Classwork helps keep me sane during isolation.
Casey Masterson | The Montclarion

Today seemed less lonely and drab for a few reasons. Two of my three roommates have tested negative and I could not be happier that my friends are safe. I will try to get more information from them (maybe even a quote or two) for tomorrow.

Also, my mom posted my blog on her Facebook, so I have been getting an influx of text messages and people willing to call and talk to me during my isolation. How can I feel lonely when I am so loved by my family? I owe them the world.

Speaking of family, my mom is shipping me some homemade potato soup. This is my favorite meal, in case anyone else wants to make me some. Just kidding. But if you really want to, go ahead.

She is having someone deliver it to the outside of my quarantine apartment, and then my friend is going to carry it up and leave it outside of my door for me to eat.

I can cook food for myself during quarantine in my kitchen. Casey Masterson | The Montclarion

I can cook food for myself during quarantine in my kitchen.
Casey Masterson | The Montclarion

I am fortunate enough to have my own kitchen. I was able to bring my food up from my old apartment, so I can cook for myself. I don’t think that I will run low on food, especially having my mom’s soup on hand. I cannot say the same for my snacks.

I am going to contact my sister, or ShopRite from Home, to leave some groceries outside the door for me to grab if I am in need of food.

Going to class today offered me a distraction from this whole sickly ordeal. I do not know what I would do without class; I would probably die from boredom.

My professors are more than accommodating. They are all willing to work with me, in case I do take a turn for the worse.

Although I am sick, the kindness of others never fails to make me smile.

Now, for the most important update: Wicket is doing fine! He always comes up to the cage doors when I enter the room.

Wicket is being very snuggly, because he knows I am sick. Casey Masterson | The Montclarion

Wicket is being very snuggly, because he knows I am sick.
Casey Masterson | The Montclarion

When I held him last night, he was more snuggly than usual. Animals usually know when something is off with their owners and Wicket is no exception.

I think tomorrow will be the hardest. I have no class tomorrow, so my communication with the outside world will be limited. I will probably have to bug my friends and family with phone calls.

I also have you, my lovely readers, to pester with my updates. I look forward to writing to you tomorrow.

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