‘Fuller’ of What You Love

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Published March 3, 2016
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The Montclarion
John Stamos plays Uncle Jesse again in "Fuller House." Photo courtesy of Josh Hallett (Flickr)

It has been over 15 years since “Full House” ended as one of the most highly beloved sitcoms in recent history. Back in 1995, “Full House” brought the audience joy, love, laughter, sorrow, happiness and, most importantly, it brought families together. That’s what made the show significant beyond teens and young adults. The value it held for families was in its relatability. Since the show has ended, television has truly not been the same.

On Feb. 26, 2016 “Fuller House” aired as a Netflix original series, bringing the audience all of the original cast members minus Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen, and creator Jeff Franklin along with executive producer, John Stamos, also reprising his role as Jesse Katsopolis.

The story takes place as DJ Tanner-Fuller (Candace Cameron Bure) is brought back to her childhood home in San Francisco, California. After the death of her husband in the line of duty as a fireman, DJ was left with her three boys, Jackson, Max and baby Tommy. With the help of her sister Stephanie Tanner (Jodie Sweetin) and best friend Kimmy Gibler (Andrea Barber), the single mother makes it work, just as her father once had. Throughout all 13 episodes, familiar faces are seen, such as Danny Tanner (Bob Saget), Joey Gladstone (Dave Coulier) and many more. However, the Olsen twins, Mary-Kate and Ashley, will not make any appearances in the hit show due to their disinterest in acting.

The show carries out many traditional references from the original series such as Tommy wearing an Elvis onesie, who is forced by Uncle Jesse to dance and sing like Elvis. Alll in all, the new series gives us promise of the family we all used to love in the 90s.

“Fuller House” had originally given fans mixed emotions along with low expectations. After the show’s airing on Netflix, it was surprisingly fun to watch and exceeded past negative reviews, allowing the rating to grow five full stars.

Although “Fuller House” is still strongly disliked by critics, fans beg to differ, encouraging other viewers to ignore the negative feedback and embrace the positive. The critics never had anything positive to say about the original “Full House,” yet it ran for eight seasons.

You need to keep an open mind when watching the show. Of course, it will never be the same as the original “Full House,” but it still holds the same values that it did in the 90s.

 

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